Global Compliance Desk – New York

New York’s minimum wage threshold has increased in accordance with their respective implementation schedules. Similarly, the New York Paid Family Leave Act’s maximum leave entitlements and pay rate will increase on January 1, 2019.

Minimum Wage Rise 

The applicable minimum wage varies based on the employee’s geographic location. The following table summarizes the new minimum wages, by location, effective December 31, 2018:

  • New York City (11+ employees) – $15.00
  • New York City (10 or fewer employees) – $13.50
  • Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester Counties – $12.00
  • Rest of State – $11.10

In New York City, employer size is based on the number of employees employed at all worksites during the current or prior calendar year.

New York Paid Family Leave

Employees will be eligible for up to 10 weeks of Paid Family Leave; an increase of 2 weeks from the previous year. In addition, the maximum rate of pay for leave has increased from $652.96 to $746.41. Finally, employers can require an increased employee payroll contribution of up to $2.07 per week. Paid Family Leave is employee-funded insurance that provides job-protected, paid time off to:

  • Bond with a newly born child or adopted or fostered child;
  • Care for a family member with a serious health condition; or
  • Assist loved ones when a spouse, domestic partner, child or parent is called to active military service abroad.

Eligibility

  • Employees with a regular work schedule of 20 or more hours per week are eligible after 26 consecutive weeks of employment.
  • Employees with a regular work schedule of fewer than 20 hours per week are eligible after 175 days worked.

Paid Family Leave Request Process:

  • Notify the employer at least 30 days in advance, if foreseeable, or as soon as possible.
  • Complete and submit the Request for Paid Family Leave (Form PFL-1) to the employer.
  • Complete and attach the additional forms as required and submit to the insurance carrier listed below within 30 days of starting
    the leave, to avoid losing benefits.
  • In most cases, the insurance carrier must pay or deny benefits within 18 calendar days of receiving the completed request or the employees first day of leave, whichever is later.

Citizenship or immigration status is not a factor in your eligibility.

Shreya Bhattacharya
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Shreya Bhattacharya
A labor and employment lawyer at Replicon who specializes in global compliance. Replicon provides award-winning products that make it easy to manage your workforce. Replicon is an industry leader in global compliance and has a dedicated team which pro-actively monitors international labor regulations for ensuring proper adherence with specific country rule requirements.
Get started today.
Set up a free trial based on your business needs. Start Free Trial

What every project-based organization should know for 2020

Software Testing News | 21st February 2020 By Jason Caines Everyone loves a fresh start – and for many, the new year provides the perfect opportunity to shake off bad…Read More

Making Diversity Work in Professional Services Firms

Professional services organizations continuously strive to expand their customer base, bring in best-in-class talent, and pursue resources with specialized skills. As a result, reaching into new geographies has become increasingly…Read More

Webinar Recap: Solved – Your Project Time Tracking, Billing & Utilization Challenges

A hearty thank you to everyone across the globe that joined us for last week’s webinar on project time tracking, billing & utilization challenges in professional services!  Our experts led…Read More

Common pitfalls in professional services organizations & how to avoid them (1/3)

The professional services organization (PSO) landscape is changing -- employees are harder to recruit and retain, a globalized marketplace increases competition for clients, clients want more for less, and management…Read More

Exempt vs non-exempt workers: simplify employee classification

In the United States, most jobs are governed by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), which classifies workers into two broad categories: exempt and non-exempt. Under the FLSA, non-exempt employees are…Read More

The five reasons employees work overtime

Very few people enjoy working overtime, and even fewer companies want their employees stretching their hours. Besides the costs of paying overtime (and a few extra costs), research has shown…Read More
  • Cloud
  • In The News
  • Corporate
  • Professional Services Management
  • Project and Program Management
  • Shared Services Management
  • Time and Attendance Management
  • Workforce Management
  • Customer Feature
  • Feature Update
  • Time Intelligence
  • Industry News
  • Webinar Recap
  • Global Compliance Updates
  • Chat with us
    How can we help you?