Mississippi

Labor Compliance Guide

Hours & Pay Regulations

Normal Working Hours

The Fair Labor Standards Act defines the workweek as a fixed and recurring period of 168 hours comprised of seven consecutive 24-hour periods that do not need to coincide with the calendar week. It is adjustable only if the change is designed to be permanent. Each week is considered on its own for purposes of calculating overtime. The hours of two or more weeks may not be averaged.

Overtime

Mississippi has no general provision governing overtime pay, but most employees would be subject to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, which requires that all nonexempt employees be paid at a rate of 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week.

Breaks

Breast Feeding Break

Breast-feeding mothers, including employees, shall be provided a sanitary place that is not a toilet stall to breast-feed their children or express milk. This area shall provide an electrical outlet, comfortable chair, and nearby access to running water. A refrigerator will be made available for storage of expressed breast milk following guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics and Centers for Disease Control in ensuring that breast milk is properly treated to avoid waste. Universal precautions are not required in handling human milk. Staff shall be trained in the safe and proper storage and handling of human milk. Breast-feeding promotion information will be displayed in order to positively promote breast-feeding to the clients of the facility. No employer shall prohibit an employee from expressing breast milk during any meal period or other break period provided by the employer.

Annual Leave

No county, board of supervisors of a county, municipality or governing authority of a municipality is authorized to establish a mandatory, minimum living wage rate, minimum number of vacation or sick days, whether paid or unpaid, that would regulate how a private employer pays its employees. Each county, board of supervisors of a county, municipality or governing authority of a municipality shall be prohibited from establishing a mandatory, minimum living wage rate, minimum number of vacation or sick days, whether paid or unpaid, that would regulate how a private employer pays its employees. The Legislature further finds that wages and employee benefits comprise the most significant expense of operating a business. It also recognizes that neither potential employees or business patrons are likely to restrict themselves to employment opportunities or goods and services in any particular county or municipality.

 

Consequently, local variations in legally required minimum wage rates or mandatory minimum number of vacation or sick leave days would threaten many businesses with a loss of employees to local governments which require a higher minimum wage rate and many other businesses with the loss of patrons to areas which allow for a lower wage rate and more or less vacation or sick days. The net effect of this situation would be detrimental to the business environment of the state and to the citizens, businesses, and governments of the local jurisdictions as well as the local labor markets.

 

Minimum Wage

Mississippi has no minimum wage law. That means eligible employees in Mississippi are entitled to the federal minimum wage. The federal minimum wage is currently $7.25 per hour. Local counties or municipalities are prohibited from setting a mandatory minimum wage rate or establishing a minimum number of vacation or sick days (paid or unpaid) that would regulate how a private employer pays its employees.

Tips & Gratuities

Employers of employees who regularly receive $30 a month or more in tips can claim a tip credit of up to $5.12 an hour; the minimum wage for these employees is $2.13 an hour. If an employee’s hourly average of tips plus wages is less than $7.25 an hour, the employer must make up the difference. If a state does not allow for a tip credit or has a tip credit amount that is less than the federal tip credit amount, employers in that state generally must apply the state amount that provides employees the greater benefit. If an employer has a tip-back arrangement with employees, such that employees are required to give or credit their tips to their employer as gross receipts, these tips cannot be credited under the FLSA and the employees must be paid at least a full minimum wage.

Special Leave

Unpaid Leave
Employees may be eligible to take unpaid, job-protected, leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”). Please refer to main United States page for further details on this Federal law.
Voting Leave

It shall be unlawful for any employer or any other person to persuade or attempt to persuade any juror to avoid jury service; to intimidate or to threaten any juror in that respect; or to remove or otherwise subject an employee to adverse employment action as a result of jury service if the employee notifies his or her employer that he or she has been summoned to serve as a juror within a reasonable period of time after receipt of a summons.

 

It shall be unlawful for an employer to require or request an employee to use annual, vacation or sick leave for time spent responding to a summons for jury duty, time spent participating in the jury selection process, or time spent actually serving on a jury. Nothing in this provision shall be construed to require an employer to provide annual, vacation or sick leave to employees under the provisions of this statute who otherwise are not entitled to such benefits under company policies.

Military Leave

Employers must re-employ workers who participate in military reserve training or are called up for military duty.

 

Donor Leave

State employees are entitled to up to 30 days of paid leave in any twelve-month period. (§25-3-103). 

Last updated on: February 7th, 2019