Slovakia

Labor Compliance Guide

Hours & Pay Regulations

Normal Working Hours

Maximum weekly working time of an employee is 40 hours. An employee whose working time is arranged in such manner that he/she regularly performs work alternately on both shifts of a two-shift operation, shall have maximum working time of 38 and ¾ hours per week, and on all shifts of a three-shift operation or a continuous operation, maximum working time of 37 and ½ hours per week. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Overtime

Payment for time worked in excess of the weekly norm must generally include a 25-percent premium, although the employee may agree to compensatory time off in lieu of overtime pay. Average weekly working hours including overtime generally cannot exceed 48. The overtime premium for hazardous work must be at least 35 percent. An employee may be required to work up to 150 hours of overtime in a calendar year and can voluntarily work up to 400 hours. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

 

Extra Pay for Night Work, Work on Weekends and Holidays
Prior to the amendment to the Labour Code, employers did not have to pay wage supplements for work performed during weekends. The first phase of Slovakia’s reform of wages for night and weekend working took effect on 1 May 2018. The second phase took effect on May 1, 2019, which is as follows:

      • At least 50% of the minimum hourly wage for work during Saturdays;
      • At least 100% of the minimum hourly wage for work during Sundays;
      • At least 40% of the minimum hourly wage for work during night shifts;
      • At least 50% of the minimum hourly wage for work during night shifts in case of high-risk jobs; and
      • At least 100% of the minimum hourly wage for work during public holidays.

If work must be performed during Saturdays, Sundays or during the night due to its nature or inevitable operating conditions, employers may agree on lower supplements in:

        • A collective agreement; or
        • Directly in employment agreements, if the employer has less than 20 employees and does not have a trade union organization.

Where most work is performed at night, employers and employees may agree in the collective agreements or directly in the work agreements for (if no unions are active and they have less than 20 employees) lower extra pay for night work than it is stated by law, however at least 35%. Similarly, employers, where the nature of the work or operating conditions require work to be performed regularly over weekends, will be able to agree in the collective agreements or directly in the work agreements (if no unions are active and they have less than 20 employees) lower extra pay than it is stated by law, minimum of 45% in case of Saturday´s work and minimum 90% in case of Sunday´s work.

Night Work

A night shift is a work shift whose greater part falls within the time period between 22:00 hours and 06:00 hours. For performance of night work, in addition to wages attained an employee shall be entitled to a wage surcharge for each hour worked at night at the level of at least 20 percent of his/her minimum wage per hour. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Public Holidays

For a period of work on a public holiday, an employee shall be entitled to wages attained and a wage surcharge of at least 50 percent of his/her earnings. A wage surcharge shall also be applicable to work performed on a public holiday that falls on a day of continuous rest for an employee in the week.

 

An employee who did not work for a reason that a public holiday fell on a normal working day for him/her shall be entitled to wage compensation in the amount of his/her average earnings if wages were lost because of the public holiday.

 

With regards to an employee who is remunerated monthly, a public holiday falling on his/her normal working day shall be considered as a working day, for which he/she shall be entitled to a wage; therefore, the employee shall not be entitled to wage compensation for the public holiday. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311; Public Holidays Act, 1993.

 

With effect from January 1, 2019, the Slovak Parliament has approved an amendment to the Labour Code introducing a recreation allowance publicly known as a ‘holiday voucher’. This amendment is aimed at supporting tourism in Slovakia by providing an allowance for employees who spend at least two nights at an accommodation facility in Slovakia, with catering and other expenses potentially covered.

 

This obligation only applies to employers with more than 49 employees (for others, it is optional) and to employees who have worked for the employer for more than two years on the day their holiday begins. The amount of the contribution is set at 55% of the employee’s eligible expenses, up to a maximum of EUR 275 per year.

Annual Leave

An employee who, during the continuous duration of an employment relationship with the same employer, performed work for the employer for at least 60 days in the calendar year shall be entitled to annual paid holiday, or a proportionate part thereof, unless the employment relationship lasted continuously over the whole calendar year.

 

The labor code stipulates at least four weeks of annual leave for every employee; those older than 33 receive five weeks of annual leave. Those employed in the education sector receive at least eight weeks of annual leave. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Special Leave

Maternity Leave

In connection to the childbirth and care for a new born child, the woman shall be entitled to maternity leave for the duration of 34 weeks. A lone woman shall be entitled to maternity leave for the duration of 37 weeks, and a woman who gave birth to two or more children simultaneously shall be entitled to maternity leave for the duration of 43 weeks. In general, a woman shall commence maternity leave at the beginning of the sixth week prior to the expected day of childbirth, at the earliest however, from the beginning of the eighth week prior to such a day. If a child is born dead, a woman shall be entitled to maternity leave for a period of 14 weeks. Maternity leave may never be shorter than 14 weeks and may not in any case whatsoever be terminated or interrupted prior to the elapse of the sixth week from the day of giving birth. In connection to the care for a new born child, the man shall also be entitled to parental leave from the birth of the child, in the same scope, provided he cares for the new born child. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Parental Leave

To deepen the care for the child the employer shall be obliged to provide a woman or a man upon their request with parental leave until the day the child turns three years old. Where a child with long-term unfavorable health state is involved requiring special care, the employer shall be obliged to provide the woman and the man, upon their request, with parental leave until the day the child turns six years old. This leave shall be provided for the length requested by the parent, as a rule for not less than one month. The law allows both parents to take parental leave, but only one to be compensated. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Adoption Leave

Women and men who adopt or foster a child are entitled to maternity and parental leave. Maternity or parental leave of 28 weeks is available to a couple who adopt or foster a child, 31 weeks to a single parent and 37 weeks to a couple who adopt or foster two or more children. Additional parental leave may be taken until the child reaches 3 years of age, 6 years of age if the child is already 3 on the date of adoption. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Marriage Leave

Employees are entitled to one day’s paid leave to be married. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Bereavement Leave

Employees are entitled to two days’ paid leave following the death of a spouse or a child and another day to attend the funeral. Employees are entitled to one day’s paid leave to attend the funeral of a close relative (e.g., parent, sibling, parent or sibling of spouse or spouse of sibling) and another day if the employee arranges the funeral. Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Additional Paid Leave

Paid leave may also be granted for the following reasons:

  • Examination or treatment in a health care institution;
  • Accompanying or taking a family member to a health care institution for examination;
  • The birth of a child to the employee’s spouse;
  • Military service or training;
  • Inability to work due to the employer’s actions.

Labor Code, 2001, No. 311.

Last updated on: May 31st, 2019